Splitting CCTV Coax Cable to Geovision DVR and Mux

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  • #31471

    Anonymous

    I have a 16 camera Geovision system in a wiring mess. I have 4 types of wiring, multiple power supplies, all spliced and taped in every direction. If I disturb one wire, many cameras go out. I would like a solution to neatly split the cable so that I can share the connections between a Geovision DVR and a CCTV mux (multiplexer). I am rewiring all to a central power supply, leaving RG59 in place, replacing all other video with RG6; one camera, one cable. 5 cameras now go to a multiplexer for additional monitor. I need to add more cameras to the multiplexer. Any suggestions appreciated for the simple way to connect everything.

    #32380

    Mike Haldas
    Participant

    mlmoore,

    Thank you for posting on the CCTV forum. I created the below CCTV cabling diagram to illustrate the recommended solution. To keep the image small, I only used 4 CCTV cameras in the example, a 4 in to 8 out video splitter, and a 4 channel Geovision DVR card, but the concepts documented can be applied to any number of cameras.

    CCTV-RG59-BNC-Cable-Splitter-Diagram.jpg

    Starting at the top of the diagram, the 4 CCTV cameras are connected using RG59 Siamese cable. CCTV Camera Pros recommends using 95% copper RG59 cable because of the quality and the convenience of running both power and video in a single cable. The black portion of the cable in the diagram represents the coaxial part of the cable and the red represents the 18/2 conductor power wire.

    The coax cable portion goes into a 4 input to 8 output BNC cable splitter. The 18 guage power cable connects to a CCTV power supply box.

    The video splitter outputs all for channels to two devices. The first device is a Geovision DVR card (which would in reality be installed in a Windows PC but now shown this way in the diagram). The second device is a CCTV multiplexer, which can then output all of the channels to a monitor (not picture in the diagram).

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